Mark 12.28-44

28 And one of the scribes came, and having heard them reasoning together, and perceiving that he had answered them well, asked him, Which is the first commandment of all?

28 And one of the scribes came, and having heard them reasoning together, and perceiving that he had answered them well, asked him, Which is the first commandment of all?

The scribes and Pharisees were  enemies to the Sadducees; now one would have expected that, when they heard Christ argue so well against the Sadducees, they would have considered him on their side, as they did Paul when he appeared against the Sadducees but it had not the effect: because he did not fall in with them in the ceremonials of religion, by his  agreeing with them in the essentials, gained him no manner of respect with them. Only we have here an account of one of them, a scribe, who had so much civility in him as to take notice of Christ’s answer to the Sadducees, and to own that he had answered well, and much to the purpose.

Acts. 23:9 8 For the Sadducees say that there is no resurrection, neither angel, nor spirit: but the Pharisees confess both.

9 And there arose a great cry: and the scribes that were of the Pharisees’ part arose, and strove, saying, We find no evil in this man: but if a spirit or an angel hath spoken to him, let us not fight against God.

10 And when there arose a great dissension, the chief captain, fearing lest Paul should have been pulled in pieces of them, commanded the soldiers to go down, and to take him by force from among them, and to bring him into the castle.

11 And the night following the Lord stood by him, and said, Be of good cheer, Paul: for as thou hast testified of me in Jerusalem, so must thou bear witness also at Rome.

29 And Jesus answered him, The first of all the commandments is, Hear, O Israel; The Lord our God is one Lord:

Those that sincerely desire to be taught the Will of the Father, Christ will guide in judgment, and teach his way. He tells him. That the greatest commandment of all, is of loving God with all our hearts. When thisis a commanding principle in your soul, there is a willingness to do your duty to God. Love is the leading affection of the soul; the love of God is the leading grace in the renewed soul. Where this is not, nothing else that is good is done. Loving God with all our heart, will effectually take us off from, and arm us against, all those things that are rivals with him for disposition of our souls, and will engage us to every thing by which he may be honored, and with which he will be pleased; and no commandment will be hard for us to obey where this principle commands. Now here in, Mark, our Saviour prefixes to this command the great doctrinal truth upon which it is built.

30 And thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind, and with all thy strength: this is the first commandment. The Lord our God is one Lord; if we firmly believe this, it will follow, that we shall love him with all our heart. He is the Heavenly Father, the creator of all, who is perfect in himself; he is our God, to whom we stand related and obliged; and therefore we ought to love him, to set our affections on him, and take a delight in him; and he is one Lord, the God Head therefore he must be loved with our whole heart; he has the sole right to us, and therefore ought to have the sole possession of us. If he be one, our hearts must be one with him, and since there is no God besides, no other gods can be admitted with him upon the throne.

31 And the second is like, namely this, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. There is none other commandmentas truly and sincerely as we love ourselves, and in the same instances, and we must show it by doing unto others as we would have done unto us. As we must therefore love God better than ourselves, because he is the Creator, a being infinitely better than we are, and must love him with all our heart, because he is one Lord, and there is no other like him; so we must love our neighbor as ourselves, because he is of the same nature with ourselves; our hearts are fashioned alike, and my neighbor and myself are of one society, that of the world of mankind; and if a fellow-Christian, and of the same sacred society, the obligation is the stronger. Was it not one God created us?. Did not one Christ redeemed us? Well might Christ say, There is no other commandment greater than these; for in these all the law is fulfilled, and if we make ourselves be obedient to these, all other instances of obedience will follow of course

32 And the scribe said unto him, Well, Master, thou hast said the truth: for there is one God; and there is none other but he:.

The scribe consented to what Christ said, and truly believed  it.

Did he really though? He commends Christ’s decision of this question; Well, Master, thou hast said the truth. Christ’s assertions did not need the scribe’s to verify it; but this scribe, being a man in authority, thought it would put some reputation upon what Christ said, to have it commended by him; and it shall be brought in evidence against those who persecuted Christ, as a deceiver, that one of themselves, even a scribe of their own, confessed that he said the truth, and said it well. And thus must we subscribe to Christ’s sayings, must set to our seal that they are true. He comments upon it. Christ had quoted that great doctrine, that the Lord our God is one Lord; and this he not only assented to, but added, “There is none other but he; and therefore we must have no other God besides.’’ This excludes all rivals with him and secures the throne entirely for him. Christ had laid down that great law, of loving God with all our hearts; and this also he explains—that it is loving him with the understanding, as those that know what abundant reason we have to love him. Our love to God, as it must be entire, so it must be an intelligent, love; we must love him with all the understanding, out of the whole understanding; our rational powers and faculties must all be set on work to pour out the love of our hearts and souls toward God.

33 And to love him with all the heart, and with all the understanding, and with all the soul, and with all the strength, and to love his neighbour as himself, is more than all whole burnt offerings and sacrifices.  Christ has said, “To love God and our neighbor is the greatest commandment of all;’’ “Yea,’’ saith the scribe, “it is better, it is more than all whole-burnt-offerings and sacrifices, more acceptable to God, and will turn to a better account to ourselves.’’ There were those who held, that the law of sacrifices was the greatest commandment of all; but this scribe readily agreed with our Savior in this—that the law of love to God and our neighbor is greater than that of sacrifice, even than that of whole-burnt-offerings, which were intended purely for the honor of God. Christ approved of what he said, and encouraged him to proceed in his enquiries of him,

34 And when Jesus saw that he answered discreetly, he said unto him, Thou art not far from the kingdom of God. And no man after that durst ask him any question. He allowed that he understood well, as far as he went; so far, so good. Jesus saw that he answered discreetly, and was the more pleased with it, because he had of late met with so many even of the scribes, men of knowledge, that answered indiscreetly, as those that had no understanding, nor desired to have any. the prejudices which other scribes were so much under the power of. He answered as one that allowed himself liberty and leisure to consider, as one that had considered. He owned that he stood near to a further advance; “Thou art not far from the kingdom of God, the kingdom of grace and glory; thou art in a likely way to be a Christian, a disciple of Christ. For the doctrine of Christ insists most upon these things. There is hope of those who make a good use of the light they have, and go as far as that will carry them, that by the grace of God they will be led further, by the clearer will of God makes for them. What became of this scribe we are not told, but would willingly hope that he took the hint Christ hereby gave him, and that, having been told by him, so much to his satisfaction, what was the great commandment of the law, he proceeded to enquire of him, or his apostles, what was the great commandment of the gospel too. Yet, if he did not,  he went no further, we are not to think it strange; for there are many who are not far be redeemed to God, and yet never make. Now, one would think, this should have invited many to consult him: but it had a contrary effect; No man, after that, dared to ask him any question; everything he said, was spoken with such authority and majesty, that everyone stood in awe of him; those that desired to learn, were ashamed to ask, and those that designed to object to His teaching, were afraid to ask.

35 And Jesus answered and said, while he taught in the temple, How say the scribes that Christ is the Son of David?

 Here, Christ shows the people how weak and defective the scribes were in their preaching, and how unable to solve the difficulties that occurred in the scriptures of the Old Testament, which they undertook to expound upon. Of this he gives an instance, which is not so fully related here as it was in Matthew. Christ was teaching in the temple: many things he said, which were not written; but notice is taken of this, because it will stir us up to enquire concerning Christ, and to enquire of him; for none can have the right knowledge of him but from himself; it is not to be had from the scribes, for they will soon be run aground

36 For David himself said by the Holy Ghost, The LORD said to my Lord, Sit thou on my right hand, till I make thine enemies thy footstool.

They told the people that the Messiah was to be the Son of David and they were right; he was not only to descend from his loins, but to fill his throne and they were looking for a warrior King not a King preaching peace to all. The scripture said it often, but the people took it as what the scribes said; whereas the truths of God should be quoted from our The Word of God rather than from man’s knowledge. for there is the is were the truth lies id in His Holy Scriptures. . Yet they could not tell them how, notwithstanding that it was very proper for David, in spirit, the spirit of prophecy, to call him his Lord, as he doth. They had taught the people that concerning the Messiah, which would be for the honor of their nation—that he should be a branch of their royal family; but they had not taken care to teach them that which was for the honor of the Messiah himself—that he should be the Son of God, and, as such, and not otherwise, David’s Lord. Thus they held the truth in unrighteousness, and were partial in the gospel, as well as in the law, of the Old Testament. They were able to say it, and prove it—that Christ was to be David’s son; but if any should object, How then doth David himself call him Lord? they would not know how to avoid the force of the objection. Now this upset the scribes, to have their ignorance thus exposed, and, no doubt, incensed them more against Christ; but the common people heard him gladly.

Lu. 1:31-33

 31 And, behold, thou shalt conceive in thy womb, and bring forth a son, and shalt call his name Jesus.32 He shall be great, and shall be called the Son of the Highest: and the Lord God shall give unto him the throne of his father David:33 And he shall reign over the house of Jacob for ever; and of his kingdom there shall be no end.

37 David therefore himself calleth him Lord; and whence is he then his son? And the common people heard him gladly.

 Ps. 110:1 The Lord said unto my Lord, Sit thou at my right hand, until I make thine enemies thy footstool.

What he preached was surprising and affecting; and though it reflected upon the scribes, it was instructive to them, and they had never heard such preaching. Mostly likely there was something more than ordinarily commanding and charming in his voice and way of delivery, as well as His understanding of the scriptures which recommended him to the affections of the common people; for we do not find that any were wrought upon to believe in him, and to follow him, but he was to them as a lovely song of one that could play well on an instrument; as Ezekiel had prophesied about Christ . And perhaps some of these cried, Crucify him, as Herod heard John Baptist gladly, and yet cut off his head

Eze. 33:30-33

30 Also, thou son of man, the children of thy people still are talking against thee by the walls and in the doors of the houses, and speak one to another, every one to his brother, saying, Come, I pray you, and hear what is the word that cometh forth from the Lord.31 And they come unto thee as the people cometh, and they sit before thee as my people, and they hear thy words, but they will not do them: for with their mouth they shew much love, but their heart goeth after their covetousness.32 And, lo, thou art unto them as a very lovely song of one that hath a pleasant voice, and can play well on an instrument: for they hear thy words, but they do them not.33 And when this cometh to pass, (lo, it will come,) then shall they know that a prophet hath been among them.

38 And he said unto them in his doctrine, Beware of the scribes, which love to go in long clothing, and love salutations in the marketplaces,

 He cautions the people to take heed of suffering themselves to be imposed upon by the scribes, and of being infected with their pride and hypocrisy. He said unto them in his doctrine, “Beware of the scribes stand upon your guard, that you neither believe their peculiar opinions, nor the opinions of the people concerning them.’’ This is why doctrine is so important. They want people to think they are great; for they go in long clothing, with vestures down to their feet, and in those they walk about the streets, as princes, or judges, or gentlemen of the long robe. Their going in such clothing was not sinful, but their loving to go in it, priding themselves in it, valuing themselves on it, commanding respect by it, saying to their long clothes, Honor me now before this people, this was a product of pride. Christ would have his disciples go with their loins girded. They affect to appear very good; for they pray, they make long prayers, as if they were very intimate with God and spoke with Him often. They took care it should be known that they prayed, that they prayed long, which, some think, intimates that they prayed not for themselves only, but for others, and therein were very particular and very large; this they did for a pretense, that they might seem to love prayer, not only for God’s sake, whom hereby they pretended to glorify, but for their neighbor’s sake, whom they pretended to be serviceable too. Here they aimed to advance themselves: they coveted applause, and were fond of it; they loved salutations in the marketplaces, and the chief seats in the synagogues, and the uppermost rooms at feasts;  to have these given them, they thought, expressed the value they had for them, who did know them, and gained them respect for those who did not. They herein aimed to enrich themselves. They devoured widows’ houses, made themselves masters of their estates by some trick or other; it was to screen themselves from the suspicion of dishonesty, that they put on the mask of piety; and that they might not be thought as bad as the worst, they were studious to seem as good as the best. Let fraud and oppression be thought the worse of for their having profaned and disgraced long prayers; but let not prayers, no nor long prayers, be thought the worse of, if made in humility and sincerity, for their having been by many such abuses of authority.  But as iniquity, thus disguised with a show of piety, is double iniquity, so its doom will be doubly heavy; These shall receive great damnation; greater than those that live without prayer, greater than they would have received for the wrong done to the poor widows, if it had not been thus disguised. The damnation of hypocrites will be of all others the greatest damnation.

Read Mt. 23 Then spake Jesus to the multitude, and to his disciples, Saying The scribes and the Pharisees sit in Moses’ seat: All therefore whatsoever they bid you observe, that observe and do; but do not ye after their works: for they say, and do not. For they bind heavy burdens and grievous to be borne, and lay them on men’s shoulders; but they themselves will not move them with one of their fingers. But all their works they do for to be seen of men: they make broad their phylacteries,( Phylacteries, sometimes called tefillin, are small, square leather boxes containing portions of Scripture worn by Conservative and Orthodox Jews during prayer services. Phylacteries are worn in pairs—one phylactery is strapped on the left arm, and one is strapped to the forehead of Jewish men during weekday morning prayers.  and enlarge the borders of their garments, And love the uppermost rooms at feasts, and the chief seats in the synagogues, And greetings in the markets, and to be called of men, Rabbi, Rabbi.But be not ye called Rabbi: for one is your Master, even Christ; and all ye are brethren.

39 And the chief seats in the synagogues, and the uppermost rooms at feasts:

Luke 14:7-14  And he put forth a parable to those which were bidden, when he marked how they chose out the chief rooms; saying unto them.When thou art bidden of any man to a wedding, sit not down in the highest room; lest a more honourable man than thou be bidden of him;And he that bade thee and him come and say to thee, Give this man place; and thou begin with shame to take the lowest room.10 But when thou art bidden, go and sit down in the lowest room; that when he that bade thee cometh, he may say unto thee, Friend, go up higher: then shalt thou have worship in the presence of them that sit at meat with thee.11 For whosoever exalteth himself shall be abased; and he that humbleth himself shall be exalted

40 Which devour widows’ houses, and for a pretence make long prayers: these shall receive greater damnation. This story is here and in Luke; it is Christ’s commendation of the poor widow, that cast two mites into the treasury, which our Savior, busy as he was in preaching, took time to take notice this event. There was a public fund for charity, into which contributions were brought, and out of which distributions were made; a poor’s-box, and this in the temple; for works of charity where God is honored by our worship, it is proper he should be honored by the relief of his poor; and we often find prayers and alms in conjunction, This goes directly back to the 2nd commandment Love they neighbor as they self. He saw many that were rich cast in much: and it was a good sight to see rich people charitable, to see many rich people so, and to see them not only cast in, but cast in much. Those that are rich, ought to give richly; if God give abundantly to us, he expects we should give abundantly to the poor; and it is not enough for those that are rich, to say, that they give as much as others do, who perhaps have much less of the world than they have, but they must give in proportion to their estates; and if objects of charity do not present themselves.

41 And Jesus sat over against the treasury, and beheld how the people cast money into the treasury: and many that were rich cast in much. IT is good to to have donation boxes and  public receptacles of charity for the inviting and directing of private hands in giving to the poor; and  it is good for those who are of ability to have funds of their own, to lay by as God has prospered them that they might have something ready to give when an object of charity offers itself, which is before dedicated to such uses. Jesus Christ had an eye upon it; He sat over against the treasury, and beheld now the people cast money into it; not grudging either that he had none to cast in, or had not the disposal of that which was cast in, but observing what was cast in. Note, Our Lord Jesus takes notice of what we contribute to pious and charitable uses; whether we give liberally or sparingly; whether cheerfully or with reluctance and ill-will; yet, he looks at the heart; he observes what principles we act upon, and what our views are, in giving to the poor; and whether we do it for the glory of the Lord, or only to be seen of men.

42 And there came a certain poor widow, and she threw in two mites, which make a farthing. There was a poor widow d our Lord Jesus highly commended her; called his disciples to him, and bid them take notice of it

43 And he called unto him his disciples, and saith unto them, Verily I say unto you, That this poor widow hath cast more in, than all they which have cast into the treasury: told them that she could not spare that which she gave, she had scarcely enough for herself, it was all her living, all she had to live upon for that day, and perhaps a great part of what she had earned by her labor the day before; and that forasmuch as he knew she did it from a truly charitable disposition, he reckoned it more than all that put together, which the rich people threw in; for they did cast in of their abundance, but she had given  all she had.

44 For all they did cast in of their abundance; but she of her want did cast in all that she had, even all her living. When we can cheerfully provide for others, out of our own necessary provision, as the widow of Sarepta for Elijah, and Christ for his five thousand guests, and trust God to provide for us some other way, this is thank-worthy. That giving alms, is good thing, and highly pleasing to the Lord Jesus; and if we be humble and sincere in it, he will graciously accept of it, as to give glory to God the Father. Those that have but a little, ought to give alms out of their little. Those that live by their labor, from hand to mouth, should give to those that need.

e, and having heard them reasoning together, and perceiving that he had answered them well, asked him, Which is the first commandment of all?

The scribes and Pharisees were  enemies to the Sadducees; now one would have expected that, when they heard Christ argue so well against the Sadducees, they would have considered him on their side, as they did Paul when he appeared against the Sadducees but it had not the effect: because he did not fall in with them in the ceremonials of religion, by his  agreeing with them in the essentials, gained him no manner of respect with them. Only we have here an account of one of them, a scribe, who had so much civility in him as to take notice of Christ’s answer to the Sadducees, and to own that he had answered well, and much to the purpose.

Acts. 23:9 8 For the Sadducees say that there is no resurrection, neither angel, nor spirit: but the Pharisees confess both.

9 And there arose a great cry: and the scribes that were of the Pharisees’ part arose, and strove, saying, We find no evil in this man: but if a spirit or an angel hath spoken to him, let us not fight against God.

10 And when there arose a great dissension, the chief captain, fearing lest Paul should have been pulled in pieces of them, commanded the soldiers to go down, and to take him by force from among them, and to bring him into the castle.

11 And the night following the Lord stood by him, and said, Be of good cheer, Paul: for as thou hast testified of me in Jerusalem, so must thou bear witness also at Rome.

29 And Jesus answered him, The first of all the commandments is, Hear, O Israel; The Lord our God is one Lord:

Those that sincerely desire to be taught the Will of the Father, Christ will guide in judgment, and teach his way. He tells him. That the greatest commandment of all, is of loving God with all our hearts. When thisis a commanding principle in your soul, there is a willingness to do your duty to God. Love is the leading affection of the soul; the love of God is the leading grace in the renewed soul. Where this is not, nothing else that is good is done. Loving God with all our heart, will effectually take us off from, and arm us against, all those things that are rivals with him for disposition of our souls, and will engage us to every thing by which he may be honored, and with which he will be pleased; and no commandment will be hard for us to obey where this principle commands. Now here in, Mark, our Saviour prefixes to this command the great doctrinal truth upon which it is built.

30 And thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind, and with all thy strength: this is the first commandment. The Lord our God is one Lord; if we firmly believe this, it will follow, that we shall love him with all our heart. He is the Heavenly Father, the creator of all, who is perfect in himself; he is our God, to whom we stand related and obliged; and therefore we ought to love him, to set our affections on him, and take a delight in him; and he is one Lord, the God Head therefore he must be loved with our whole heart; he has the sole right to us, and therefore ought to have the sole possession of us. If he be one, our hearts must be one with him, and since there is no God besides, no other gods can be admitted with him upon the throne.

31 And the second is like, namely this, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. There is none other commandmentas truly and sincerely as we love ourselves, and in the same instances, and we must show it by doing unto others as we would have done unto us. As we must therefore love God better than ourselves, because he is the Creator, a being infinitely better than we are, and must love him with all our heart, because he is one Lord, and there is no other like him; so we must love our neighbor as ourselves, because he is of the same nature with ourselves; our hearts are fashioned alike, and my neighbor and myself are of one society, that of the world of mankind; and if a fellow-Christian, and of the same sacred society, the obligation is the stronger. Was it not one God created us?. Did not one Christ redeemed us? Well might Christ say, There is no other commandment greater than these; for in these all the law is fulfilled, and if we make ourselves be obedient to these, all other instances of obedience will follow of course

32 And the scribe said unto him, Well, Master, thou hast said the truth: for there is one God; and there is none other but he:.

The scribe consented to what Christ said, and truly believed  it.

Did he really though? He commends Christ’s decision of this question; Well, Master, thou hast said the truth. Christ’s assertions did not need the scribe’s to verify it; but this scribe, being a man in authority, thought it would put some reputation upon what Christ said, to have it commended by him; and it shall be brought in evidence against those who persecuted Christ, as a deceiver, that one of themselves, even a scribe of their own, confessed that he said the truth, and said it well. And thus must we subscribe to Christ’s sayings, must set to our seal that they are true. He comments upon it. Christ had quoted that great doctrine, that the Lord our God is one Lord; and this he not only assented to, but added, “There is none other but he; and therefore we must have no other God besides.’’ This excludes all rivals with him and secures the throne entirely for him. Christ had laid down that great law, of loving God with all our hearts; and this also he explains—that it is loving him with the understanding, as those that know what abundant reason we have to love him. Our love to God, as it must be entire, so it must be an intelligent, love; we must love him with all the understanding, out of the whole understanding; our rational powers and faculties must all be set on work to pour out the love of our hearts and souls toward God.

33 And to love him with all the heart, and with all the understanding, and with all the soul, and with all the strength, and to love his neighbour as himself, is more than all whole burnt offerings and sacrifices.  Christ has said, “To love God and our neighbor is the greatest commandment of all;’’ “Yea,’’ saith the scribe, “it is better, it is more than all whole-burnt-offerings and sacrifices, more acceptable to God, and will turn to a better account to ourselves.’’ There were those who held, that the law of sacrifices was the greatest commandment of all; but this scribe readily agreed with our Savior in this—that the law of love to God and our neighbor is greater than that of sacrifice, even than that of whole-burnt-offerings, which were intended purely for the honor of God. Christ approved of what he said, and encouraged him to proceed in his enquiries of him,

34 And when Jesus saw that he answered discreetly, he said unto him, Thou art not far from the kingdom of God. And no man after that durst ask him any question. He allowed that he understood well, as far as he went; so far, so good. Jesus saw that he answered discreetly, and was the more pleased with it, because he had of late met with so many even of the scribes, men of knowledge, that answered indiscreetly, as those that had no understanding, nor desired to have any. the prejudices which other scribes were so much under the power of. He answered as one that allowed himself liberty and leisure to consider, as one that had considered. He owned that he stood near to a further advance; “Thou art not far from the kingdom of God, the kingdom of grace and glory; thou art in a likely way to be a Christian, a disciple of Christ. For the doctrine of Christ insists most upon these things. There is hope of those who make a good use of the light they have, and go as far as that will carry them, that by the grace of God they will be led further, by the clearer will of God makes for them. What became of this scribe we are not told, but would willingly hope that he took the hint Christ hereby gave him, and that, having been told by him, so much to his satisfaction, what was the great commandment of the law, he proceeded to enquire of him, or his apostles, what was the great commandment of the gospel too. Yet, if he did not,  he went no further, we are not to think it strange; for there are many who are not far be redeemed to God, and yet never make. Now, one would think, this should have invited many to consult him: but it had a contrary effect; No man, after that, dared to ask him any question; everything he said, was spoken with such authority and majesty, that everyone stood in awe of him; those that desired to learn, were ashamed to ask, and those that designed to object to His teaching, were afraid to ask.

35 And Jesus answered and said, while he taught in the temple, How say the scribes that Christ is the Son of David?

 Here, Christ shows the people how weak and defective the scribes were in their preaching, and how unable to solve the difficulties that occurred in the scriptures of the Old Testament, which they undertook to expound upon. Of this he gives an instance, which is not so fully related here as it was in Matthew. Christ was teaching in the temple: many things he said, which were not written; but notice is taken of this, because it will stir us up to enquire concerning Christ, and to enquire of him; for none can have the right knowledge of him but from himself; it is not to be had from the scribes, for they will soon be run aground

36 For David himself said by the Holy Ghost, The LORD said to my Lord, Sit thou on my right hand, till I make thine enemies thy footstool.

They told the people that the Messiah was to be the Son of David and they were right; he was not only to descend from his loins, but to fill his throne and they were looking for a warrior King not a King preaching peace to all. The scripture said it often, but the people took it as what the scribes said; whereas the truths of God should be quoted from our The Word of God rather than from man’s knowledge. for there is the is were the truth lies id in His Holy Scriptures. . Yet they could not tell them how, notwithstanding that it was very proper for David, in spirit, the spirit of prophecy, to call him his Lord, as he doth. They had taught the people that concerning the Messiah, which would be for the honor of their nation—that he should be a branch of their royal family; but they had not taken care to teach them that which was for the honor of the Messiah himself—that he should be the Son of God, and, as such, and not otherwise, David’s Lord. Thus they held the truth in unrighteousness, and were partial in the gospel, as well as in the law, of the Old Testament. They were able to say it, and prove it—that Christ was to be David’s son; but if any should object, How then doth David himself call him Lord? they would not know how to avoid the force of the objection. Now this upset the scribes, to have their ignorance thus exposed, and, no doubt, incensed them more against Christ; but the common people heard him gladly.

Lu. 1:31-33

 31 And, behold, thou shalt conceive in thy womb, and bring forth a son, and shalt call his name Jesus.32 He shall be great, and shall be called the Son of the Highest: and the Lord God shall give unto him the throne of his father David:33 And he shall reign over the house of Jacob for ever; and of his kingdom there shall be no end.

37 David therefore himself calleth him Lord; and whence is he then his son? And the common people heard him gladly.

 Ps. 110:1 The Lord said unto my Lord, Sit thou at my right hand, until I make thine enemies thy footstool.

What he preached was surprising and affecting; and though it reflected upon the scribes, it was instructive to them, and they had never heard such preaching. Mostly likely there was something more than ordinarily commanding and charming in his voice and way of delivery, as well as His understanding of the scriptures which recommended him to the affections of the common people; for we do not find that any were wrought upon to believe in him, and to follow him, but he was to them as a lovely song of one that could play well on an instrument; as Ezekiel had prophesied about Christ . And perhaps some of these cried, Crucify him, as Herod heard John Baptist gladly, and yet cut off his head

Eze. 33:30-33

30 Also, thou son of man, the children of thy people still are talking against thee by the walls and in the doors of the houses, and speak one to another, every one to his brother, saying, Come, I pray you, and hear what is the word that cometh forth from the Lord.31 And they come unto thee as the people cometh, and they sit before thee as my people, and they hear thy words, but they will not do them: for with their mouth they shew much love, but their heart goeth after their covetousness.32 And, lo, thou art unto them as a very lovely song of one that hath a pleasant voice, and can play well on an instrument: for they hear thy words, but they do them not.33 And when this cometh to pass, (lo, it will come,) then shall they know that a prophet hath been among them.

38 And he said unto them in his doctrine, Beware of the scribes, which love to go in long clothing, and love salutations in the marketplaces,

 He cautions the people to take heed of suffering themselves to be imposed upon by the scribes, and of being infected with their pride and hypocrisy. He said unto them in his doctrine, “Beware of the scribes stand upon your guard, that you neither believe their peculiar opinions, nor the opinions of the people concerning them.’’ This is why doctrine is so important. They want people to think they are great; for they go in long clothing, with vestures down to their feet, and in those they walk about the streets, as princes, or judges, or gentlemen of the long robe. Their going in such clothing was not sinful, but their loving to go in it, priding themselves in it, valuing themselves on it, commanding respect by it, saying to their long clothes, Honor me now before this people, this was a product of pride. Christ would have his disciples go with their loins girded. They affect to appear very good; for they pray, they make long prayers, as if they were very intimate with God and spoke with Him often. They took care it should be known that they prayed, that they prayed long, which, some think, intimates that they prayed not for themselves only, but for others, and therein were very particular and very large; this they did for a pretense, that they might seem to love prayer, not only for God’s sake, whom hereby they pretended to glorify, but for their neighbor’s sake, whom they pretended to be serviceable too. Here they aimed to advance themselves: they coveted applause, and were fond of it; they loved salutations in the marketplaces, and the chief seats in the synagogues, and the uppermost rooms at feasts;  to have these given them, they thought, expressed the value they had for them, who did know them, and gained them respect for those who did not. They herein aimed to enrich themselves. They devoured widows’ houses, made themselves masters of their estates by some trick or other; it was to screen themselves from the suspicion of dishonesty, that they put on the mask of piety; and that they might not be thought as bad as the worst, they were studious to seem as good as the best. Let fraud and oppression be thought the worse of for their having profaned and disgraced long prayers; but let not prayers, no nor long prayers, be thought the worse of, if made in humility and sincerity, for their having been by many such abuses of authority.  But as iniquity, thus disguised with a show of piety, is double iniquity, so its doom will be doubly heavy; These shall receive great damnation; greater than those that live without prayer, greater than they would have received for the wrong done to the poor widows, if it had not been thus disguised. The damnation of hypocrites will be of all others the greatest damnation.

Read Mt. 23 Then spake Jesus to the multitude, and to his disciples, Saying The scribes and the Pharisees sit in Moses’ seat: All therefore whatsoever they bid you observe, that observe and do; but do not ye after their works: for they say, and do not. For they bind heavy burdens and grievous to be borne, and lay them on men’s shoulders; but they themselves will not move them with one of their fingers. But all their works they do for to be seen of men: they make broad their phylacteries,( Phylacteries, sometimes called tefillin, are small, square leather boxes containing portions of Scripture worn by Conservative and Orthodox Jews during prayer services. Phylacteries are worn in pairs—one phylactery is strapped on the left arm, and one is strapped to the forehead of Jewish men during weekday morning prayers.  and enlarge the borders of their garments, And love the uppermost rooms at feasts, and the chief seats in the synagogues, And greetings in the markets, and to be called of men, Rabbi, Rabbi.But be not ye called Rabbi: for one is your Master, even Christ; and all ye are brethren.

39 And the chief seats in the synagogues, and the uppermost rooms at feasts:

Luke 14:7-14  And he put forth a parable to those which were bidden, when he marked how they chose out the chief rooms; saying unto them.When thou art bidden of any man to a wedding, sit not down in the highest room; lest a more honourable man than thou be bidden of him;And he that bade thee and him come and say to thee, Give this man place; and thou begin with shame to take the lowest room.10 But when thou art bidden, go and sit down in the lowest room; that when he that bade thee cometh, he may say unto thee, Friend, go up higher: then shalt thou have worship in the presence of them that sit at meat with thee.11 For whosoever exalteth himself shall be abased; and he that humbleth himself shall be exalted

40 Which devour widows’ houses, and for a pretence make long prayers: these shall receive greater damnation. This story is here and in Luke; it is Christ’s commendation of the poor widow, that cast two mites into the treasury, which our Savior, busy as he was in preaching, took time to take notice this event. There was a public fund for charity, into which contributions were brought, and out of which distributions were made; a poor’s-box, and this in the temple; for works of charity where God is honored by our worship, it is proper he should be honored by the relief of his poor; and we often find prayers and alms in conjunction, This goes directly back to the 2nd commandment Love they neighbor as they self. He saw many that were rich cast in much: and it was a good sight to see rich people charitable, to see many rich people so, and to see them not only cast in, but cast in much. Those that are rich, ought to give richly; if God give abundantly to us, he expects we should give abundantly to the poor; and it is not enough for those that are rich, to say, that they give as much as others do, who perhaps have much less of the world than they have, but they must give in proportion to their estates; and if objects of charity do not present themselves.

41 And Jesus sat over against the treasury, and beheld how the people cast money into the treasury: and many that were rich cast in much. IT is good to to have donation boxes and  public receptacles of charity for the inviting and directing of private hands in giving to the poor; and  it is good for those who are of ability to have funds of their own, to lay by as God has prospered them that they might have something ready to give when an object of charity offers itself, which is before dedicated to such uses. Jesus Christ had an eye upon it; He sat over against the treasury, and beheld now the people cast money into it; not grudging either that he had none to cast in, or had not the disposal of that which was cast in, but observing what was cast in. Note, Our Lord Jesus takes notice of what we contribute to pious and charitable uses; whether we give liberally or sparingly; whether cheerfully or with reluctance and ill-will; yet, he looks at the heart; he observes what principles we act upon, and what our views are, in giving to the poor; and whether we do it for the glory of the Lord, or only to be seen of men.

42 And there came a certain poor widow, and she threw in two mites, which make a farthing. There was a poor widow d our Lord Jesus highly commended her; called his disciples to him, and bid them take notice of it

43 And he called unto him his disciples, and saith unto them, Verily I say unto you, That this poor widow hath cast more in, than all they which have cast into the treasury: told them that she could not spare that which she gave, she had scarcely enough for herself, it was all her living, all she had to live upon for that day, and perhaps a great part of what she had earned by her labor the day before; and that forasmuch as he knew she did it from a truly charitable disposition, he reckoned it more than all that put together, which the rich people threw in; for they did cast in of their abundance, but she had given  all she had.

44 For all they did cast in of their abundance; but she of her want did cast in all that she had, even all her living. When we can cheerfully provide for others, out of our own necessary provision, as the widow of Sarepta for Elijah, and Christ for his five thousand guests, and trust God to provide for us some other way, this is thank-worthy. That giving alms, is good thing, and highly pleasing to the Lord Jesus; and if we be humble and sincere in it, he will graciously accept of it, as to give glory to God the Father. Those that have but a little, ought to give alms out of their little. Those that live by their labor, from hand to mouth, should give to those that need.

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